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alice02 152 ( +1 | -1 )
Dropping queen - knowing whento spend more time on Oh dear I have dropped another queen. lol. I wish I could detect that I wasn't paying enough attention prior to making bad moves.

But I woonder if anyone has a way of working out when they are at risk of making bad moves.

eg I was thinking of getting a chess book with two move checkmates and timing how long I took to get a puzzle out before I actually made a move on gk. but I think it would be difficult to get a lot of of puzzles at equal level.

Then I thought of some kind of mental arithmetic eg counting back from 100 in 3 and 3/4 before I made the move and I would not make the move un til I could do it. (UH Oh - timeout lol) but I would have to vary it because hopefully Iwould get better with practice. I think this would be good as a meditation technique to clear the mind even if it doesn't tell me how much time I spend on a move.

Also does anyone find they have "bilological clock" effects with their chess - ie better playing in the morning, evening.

Perhaps being able to pick best times for play would be even more important for people with a variable illness or recovering from an illness that had subtle cognitive effects.

Does anyone have any way of knowing they are at risk of making a very bad move?

When you look back at a bad move was there any way you could have predicted the move you made was not going to be so good?

Do you have a technique that assists focus and clear thinking?
jsemmens 23 ( +1 | -1 )
Bad moves personally, I would prefer to move relatively early in the morning, early enough to not be tired, but not too groggy. also i try staringat the board before i go to bed, then sometimes i actually see things i didn't before while lieing in bed.
azaris 70 ( +1 | -1 )
Avoiding blunders I find the easiest way to blunder is to analyze some candidate move very deeply, several ply, and then come to the conclusion that it's not good. There is then a tendency upon finding any alternative move to just "go for it", since you're already tired from all the analyzing. Sometimes that "better move" is just a hideous blunder. This is a danger especially in OTB play, and in correspondence you should never play a move impulsively because it looks OK and you're tired of thinking. Just put the game on hold and return to it tomorrow.

Also, whenever you sense danger, double-check everything! I mean verifying in your head, not giving double-check to the enemy king.
soikins 76 ( +1 | -1 )
offtopic Counting back is a known concentration exercise :) I use it before every tournament game. Going like 269 - 14 = 255 -14 = 241 etc. untill 0 or negative number. It helps to contrenrate for teh game. Though, doing it before every move would be stupid, calculating the moves would be wiser. On the other hand -- GK is a different case. Here you don't play entire game at once, you play a single move in several games. So, I wold suggest to use some kind of concentration exercise before you start you serie of moves (like a single move in 20 games or smth.), when you have just 1 or 2 moves waiting, just ignore them. Wait untill there are several, then there is point to concentrate.

Hope that helps.
wulebgr 60 ( +1 | -1 )
I look at my games first thing in the morning, but only make the moves that are crystal clear--either the line is forcing, or I've spent two days mulling it over.

Then, I use the print feature for the positions I want to spend some time on, and I take these diagrams to the coffeehouse or to the chessboard in my living room (depending on the day of the week).

As for knowing when I'm about to make a bad move--I wish. Still, I've worked more than a thousand mate in two problems over the past 3-4 years, and have played many thousands of internet blitz games. Both activities sharpen the tactics a bit.
wulebgr 60 ( +1 | -1 )
I look at my games first thing in the morning, but only make the moves that are crystal clear--either the line is forcing, or I've spent two days muling it over.

Then, I use the print feature for the positions I want to spend some time on, and I take these diagrams to the coffeehouse or to the chessboard in my living room (depending on the day of the week).

As for knowing when I'm about to make a bad move--I wish. Still, I've worked more than a thousand mate in two problems over the past 3-4 years, and have played many thousands of internet blitz games. Both activities sharpen the tactics a bit.
ecfchamps2002 16 ( +1 | -1 )
Excellent idea wulebgr! I had never even thought about printing out the positions and carrying them around with me. I will have to start doing that! Thanks!
More: Chess
maca 54 ( +1 | -1 )
I move in the evening I think I would hate moving early in the morning, but I move like 6 pm, when I go to my local library to move. I have dropped so many queens, that I can't even remember. I think the bottom line is that you should never 'react'. 'Reacting' is to make a simple-looking move quickly. That's quite dangerous, becouse there are no fully clear things in chess. You should always remember to watch the position.

MaCa
wschmidt 111 ( +1 | -1 )
If you're dropping queens.... or other pieces because you're simply leaving them unprotected, i.e., simple oversight, then Gameknot provides a wonderful way to solve that problem. Simply go to the Analyze the board feature, make the move you intend to make and then, literally, make every possible move the opponent can make starting with the pawns, then the minor pieces, then the rooks and queen, then the king. If one of those is a capture you don't want to happen, you find yourself another move. You can also do the same exercise in your head.
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If you're dropping those pieces because you haven't seen the outcome of sequence of moves, I'd recommend the tactics exercises, not to figure out how long you should be spending on your own moves, but because you want to improve your calculation.
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I offer these suggestions, you understand, as someone who finds the first sort of oversight a continual source of frustration in my game. I don't mind it so much when I've considered an opponent's response and not realized its full import. But I hate it when I realize I didn't even consider the possiblity of that move! It can ruin my day.
naiad 61 ( +1 | -1 )
Yes alice02.. I also wish there was a way to know beforehand! Sometimes I'll sign on to GK and make idiotic moves in three or four games before I pause and think "Maybe I shouldn't move at all today?". Other times I have thought I was making brilliant moves and dazzling combinations only to find the next day that I had given away a major piece or completely missed a mate (ouch). When I do notice it's happening I just give up for the day and do some gardening or something instead but sadly I can't always tell - my lucky opponents! ;) Let me know if you think of a way to tell when your playing's off :)
astinkyfart 24 ( +1 | -1 )
I THINK THE BIGGEST THING IS NOT MOVING WHEN YOUR TIRED. I OFTEN PLAY LATE AT NIGHT WHEN I KNOW I SHOULDNT AND THATS USUALLY WHEN I MAKE STUPID MISTAKES. ALSO DONT PLAY WHILE YOU DRINK ;)
naiad 19 ( +1 | -1 )
Oh yeah astinkyfart! I've been out at night partying, come home and decided to see if there were any moves to make: "Don't mess with me, I know chess - I'm DA QUEEN!"
Disastrous. Embarrassing. Just. Go. Straight. To bed. :)
crazycanuck 110 ( +1 | -1 )
Avoiding blunders' ................ is always something that will be a part of human nature. I will bet that even before Kasparov was World Champion that he blundered away a good many Q's!! LOL I know that is problaly a little hard for us everyday players' but even the SGM's are not immune to error. They seem to hide their errs better then we do. I know that although I coach kids at the local chess club they ask me why don't I make mistakes. I tell them that they have not figured out what a good move is and a bad move!! Deep Blue doesn't make mistakes on the board but hey that is a machine and we are not machines. If I had an answer to How to Avoid Blunders I probably would write a book and it would be a #1 Best Seller world wide. All I can say is avoid the board if your feeling tired, if you have lack of confidence or even if you made a blunderous move just wait and see what your opponent has done. Maybe he is rolling around the floor splitting his sides laughing and when he comes back to move he will return the gift to you. :D
bananaman1 19 ( +1 | -1 )
Move in the morning I find if I am puzzled about a move it is best to sleep on it and I usually sit in bed in
the morning and work it out before getting up to make my move. Sometimes I even
dream out the game and see where it will end up.
alice02 59 ( +1 | -1 )
ive worked out three things i shouldnt play if i look at the board and
1 i see where a piece is ie knight is on c3 rather than relationships eg the squares the knight is defending
2. if i have a sense that i am looking at parts of the board without moving on to relate them. ((i get so caught up with one corner i forget the possible attacks from elsewhere) although that is part of being a beginner
3 i think "o i missed that" perhaps missing something important doesnt mean i have missed only that particular move it means i have been thinking incorrectly about the whole board